Josh Walker

Josh Walker

Regional Executive Director (Mid-Atlantic)

College: Penn State University
Major: Journalism
College Sport: Wrestling
Hometown: Lancaster, PA
Current Home: Chalfont, PA
Favorite Athletes:Cael Sanderson

BIO: 

Josh Walker joined team impact in January 2020 as Regional Executive Director for the Mid-Atlantic. Based in Philadelphia, Josh oversees program and development operations for the Mid-Atlantic Region. Josh brings with him more than 15 years of experience in NCAA coaching, non-profit management, and children’s hospital fundraising, most recently serving as a Director of Development at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) where he specialized in raising major gifts for the Cancer Center, Division of Neurosurgery, and Palliative Care.

After a successful wrestling career as a student-athlete at Penn State, Josh began his professional career as an assistant wrestling coach at the University of Virginia before eventually transitioning into nonprofit work with Special Olympics Virginia. These experiences taught him the power that philanthropy can have to help families and children in need, and they became stepping stones for his work as a fundraiser in pediatric medicine at both the University of Virginia Children’s Hospital and CHOP.

Josh earned a B.A. in Journalism from Pennsylvania State University where he was a captain of the wrestling team during his senior year. He also served as vice president of the Student Athlete Advisory Board and was Penn State’s representative to the Big Ten and the NCAA Leadership Conference.

Josh resides in Bucks County, PA, with his wife and three children. In his spare time, he coaches youth wrestling and enjoys spending time outdoors with his family.

When asked the question, “Why Team IMPACT?” Josh said:

Team IMPACT combines the two areas I am most passionate about – team sports and children’s healthcare. For me, there was no more formative experience growing up than playing team sports. Those experiences helped me gain confidence, build relationships, and grow as person. Conversely, there is no cause that I believe to be more important than the health of children. Breakthroughs in pediatric medicine are allowing clinicians to save more lives than ever before, but greater attention needs to paid to the psychosocial impact that childhood illnesses are having on patients and their families. The clinical approach that Team IMPACT is using to address these psychosocial needs by intersecting college athletics with children’s healthcare is unprecedented, and I feel blessed to be part of an organization that is making such a lasting impact on both patient families and student-athletes.